LANGUAGE IN INDIA

Strength for Today and Bright Hope for Tomorrow

Volume 6 : 2 February 2006

Editor: M. S. Thirumalai, Ph.D.
Associate Editors: B. Mallikarjun, Ph.D.
         Sam Mohanlal, Ph.D.
         B. A. Sharada, Ph.D.
         A. R. Fatihi, Ph.D.
         Lakhan Gusain, Ph.D.

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  • Contributors from South Asia may send their articles to
    B. Mallikarjun,
    Central Institute of Indian Languages,
    Manasagangotri,
    Mysore 570006, India
    or e-mail to mallikarjun@ciil.stpmy.soft.net
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Copyright © 2004
M. S. Thirumalai


 
Web www.languageinindia.com

LANGUAGE VIEWED CLINICALLY
Ranjit Singh Rangila


INTRODUCTION

This writing is primarily concerned with those human bodies that do not develop a natural ability to produce sounds that may be identified as speech sounds.

  • The vocalization that these human beings may sometimes produce could participate in some kind of vague expression creation that is more of an attempt at gesture making.
  • That is, even though in certain cases there could be some vocalic ability to produce unites of some character, they are never the discrete sounds that make a given language.
  • These human beings are, therefore, not language producing bodies. Rather, they are the bodies that may be waiting for assistance so that they could be put on their journey to language.
  • Language in such cases is a point to be reached, and not a state of ability. They reach this ability only after they travel through an aided journey of gaining sounds that make language.
  • The expression language clinically in the title, when translated into an inquiry, therefore, reads as this question: How does a needy body travel during journey to gain language with the help of clinical intervention?

CLINICAL NATURE OF THE PROBLEM

As a mater of investigative focus this writing proposes to investigate what may be called the clinicality problem.

This problem has a very mega spread and it unfolds in multiple directions. Therefore, the first job here is to workout some picture of the problem so that it is clear as to what exactly could be the focus of the investigation that the writing undertakes. There is, for instance, a condition of soundlessness due to the non-development of sound producing ability the concern of the writing expressed above.

Then there is a condition of ill-formedness. That is, an individual has some version of sound producing ability, but the sounds as such lack proper formation. Even if the vocalization is somehow identifiable as some kind of sounds, they do not make to the language grade clarity. In majority of the cases the sounds within this condition lackdiscreteness one of the basic properties of speech sounds that participate in language formation.

There is also a condition of accidental loss in which human beings with normal and established ability to well produce sounds lose the ability due to some injury or some such external-internal cause (see Jakobson 1971ed).

All these better observable conditions of soundlessness are somehow also linked with the ones that are not directly and easily locatable, though they cause sound impairments. In accordance with an observational facility developed in a previous writing (see Rangila 2002) all these problem-making conditions can be lifted up from their individual spheres of reality and generality up to a more wide, call it meta and para conditions of clinicality.

RANJIT SINGH RANGILA

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO READ A PRINTER-FRIENDLY COMPLETE COPY OF THIS PAPER.


Orwell's 1984 : Language of Totalitarianism | Syntax and Semantics of Verbs of Communication in English and Tamil | Practicing Literary Translation -- Fifth Round | The Effect of Text Cohesion on Reading Comprehension | The Discourse of Crossword Puzzles | English and Bengali Interrogative Sentences : A Comparative Study | Language Viewed Clinically | A Socio-Pragmatic Comparative Study of Ostensible Invitations in English and Farsi | HOME PAGE | CONTACT EDITOR


Ranjit Singh Rangila
Central Institute of Indian Languages
Manasagangothri, Mysore 570006
India
rangila@ciil.stpmy.soft.net
 
Web www.languageinindia.com
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